Determination of Bacteria Reduction Capacity

Determination of Bacteria Reduction Capacity

Quantification of bacterial cells is an important tool to characterize environmental systems and to explain in situ substrate turnover processes. For this purpose, besides molecular-based techniques, microscopic counting and cultivation-based methods such as plaque count or most probable count are still important and widely used.

Determination of Bacteria Reduction Capacity

Measuring the growth rate of a bacterial culture provides scientists with information about its physiological and metabolic functions and is also useful for obtaining the correct cell count of the bacterium for downstream applications.

Bacteria are among the most abundant life forms on earth. These are found in every ecosystem and are vital to daily life. For example, bacteria affect what people eat, drink, and breathe. In fact, there are more bacterial cells in a person's body than mammalian cells. Because of the importance of bacteria, it is preferred to study certain bacterial species in the laboratory. To do this, bacteria are grown in pure culture under controlled conditions, i.e. only one bacterial species is considered. Bacteria grow rapidly in pure culture and their cell numbers increase dramatically in a short time. A growth curve is obtained by measuring the rate of increase of the cell population over time. This is important, for example, when aiming to use or inoculate a known number of bacterial isolates to enhance plant growth, enhance biodegradation of toxic organics, or produce antibiotics or other natural products on an industrial scale.

Filters are a good place for bacteria to grow because there is plenty of water, the filters are dark and warm, and the bacteria can feed on the organics present. While most of these bacteria are not harmful to health, they can cause problems with drinking water and filters. For example, bacteria released into filtered water can affect taste, odor and appearance. Downstream biofilm build-up and fouling can reduce filter effectiveness by reducing absorption and causing premature clogging, thereby shortening filter life. As bacteria multiply and accumulate in a filter, they form a biofilm. Biofilm is a slime growth that accumulates on the filter membrane.

Our organization also provides bacteria reduction capacity determination services with its trained and expert staff and advanced technological equipment, among the numerous test, measurement, analysis and evaluation studies it provides for businesses in various sectors.

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